Teaching Undergraduates Skills?!? Psh!

During our seminar last week, we never really answered the question, what skills are we supposed to teach students in a history class? Well, here is my (hopefully) concise recommendations for the skills we ought to be developing in students who are forced (at gunpoint apparently) to take our survey courses.

First and foremost, we must instill and develop analytical skills. Though students hate the infamous paper, it is perhaps the best tool we have to promote historical analysis. Unfortunately, many professors fail to package (or sell) the papers as means to an end. Rather, students see the analytical essay as the end. We ought to sell the essay as a tool to practice analytical thought that can be profitable and useful later in most if not all professions, not just history.

Second and apparently a popular subject in our seminar’s discussions, our lectures, assignments and assessments should promote the students’ understanding of human interaction in world history. Why not embrace the present, globalized world as a theme that ties world history together and makes it relevant to the individual student? If we can make our content relevant, then students will digest more, though still not all, of the information we so shamelessly shove down the throats of mostly unwilling students.

Third, world history instructors should take great care to foster understanding and acceptance of the myriad cultures, polities, societies, religions, languages and commodities that define and have helped to shape this world. Though this seems like a tall order, I am not suggesting we teach everything about everyone every time, but rather, we ought to provide examples of the variety of the human experience that promote tolerance.

Lastly, we ought to provide instruction and practice for students to not just learn a little bit about the wide, wide world. Instead, we need to give them the research and reading skills that will allow them to find the information on their own, since there is no way in hell we can teach them everything about world history. In the end, we ought to have provided the students the ability to find, analyze and digest the information without the help of the instructor.

Of course this is not an exhaustive list, but just examples by which we can build upon. Thoughts?